Rate this item
(0 votes)

Counselling Women on Abortion

By Ann Farmer

It is sad that the Prime Minister and the Health Secretary Andrew Lansley have announced they will vote against Nadine Dorries's Bill to ensure that women contemplating an abortion will be entitled to make a properly informed choice ('Cameron will oppose plan to change rules on abortion advice', Telegraph, September 1, 2011). But it is not surprising, when abortion advocates like Dr. Evan Harris, BMA member and former MP, continue to assert that '"[t]here is no evidence of a real problem and there is clear evidence of a risk to women in disrupting the current arrangements"'. Even if he ignores the argument that abortion kills a living human being, clearly shown in 4-D scans, there is a wealth of evidence that abortion causes long-term psychological damage to women as well as posing a risk to their child-bearing capacity by damaging the cervix, which is forced open to facilitate the abortion, and which can lead to a significant future risk of premature pregnancy. Such evidence should be made available to women as a right; most hope to have children in the future and could go through with a 'crisis' pregnancy if offered appropriate help. Abortion advocates warn that delaying such women will put them at risk because the pregnancy will be further advanced; their response to any perceived problem is to urge that abortions be performed even earlier, with even less 'red tape'.

They insist that women know they want abortion and should not be deflected from that decision. This flies in the face of personal testimonies from many women who have regretted having an abortion and wish they had been better advised, or even that someone had listened to their concerns; many actually believed that the 'pregnancy advisory centre' would do just that. Ironically, the picture that emerges from their experiences is the feeling that they had no choice.

By Ann Farmer

It is sad that the Prime Minister and the Health Secretary Andrew Lansley have announced they will vote against Nadine Dorries's Bill to ensure that women contemplating an abortion will be entitled to make a properly informed choice ('Cameron will oppose plan to change rules on abortion advice', Telegraph, September 1, 2011). But it is not surprising, when abortion advocates like Dr. Evan Harris, BMA member and former MP, continue to assert that '"[t]here is no evidence of a real problem and there is clear evidence of a risk to women in disrupting the current arrangements"'. Even if he ignores the argument that abortion kills a living human being, clearly shown in 4-D scans, there is a wealth of evidence that abortion causes long-term psychological damage to women as well as posing a risk to their child-bearing capacity by damaging the cervix, which is forced open to facilitate the abortion, and which can lead to a significant future risk of premature pregnancy. Such evidence should be made available to women as a right; most hope to have children in the future and could go through with a 'crisis' pregnancy if offered appropriate help. Abortion advocates warn that delaying such women will put them at risk because the pregnancy will be further advanced; their response to any perceived problem is to urge that abortions be performed even earlier, with even less 'red tape'.

They insist that women know they want abortion and should not be deflected from that decision. This flies in the face of personal testimonies from many women who have regretted having an abortion and wish they had been better advised, or even that someone had listened to their concerns; many actually believed that the 'pregnancy advisory centre' would do just that. Ironically, the picture that emerges from their experiences is the feeling that they had no choice.

If Nadine Dorries's Bill fails, the only beneficiary will be the abortion industry, which will be able to continue to make huge amounts of (mostly taxpayers') money out of destroying the unborn in their millions, safe in the knowledge that asking women before the abortion whether they are 'sure about it' will suffice. Abortion is their business, even if nominally they are charities, and as such, inevitably they see women and babies as commodities. At least many consumer purchases now have a mandatory 'cooling off period' so that customers have the option of cancelling a decision made in haste. Dr Harris would allow women facing a life and death decision no such chance to change their minds.

Yours faithfully,

Ann Farmer

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. HTML code is not allowed.